.

.

Home   |   Email Glenn

Columns

Blog

Bio

Radio/TV

Campaigns

His Side

E-Newsletter

Contact

 

PBS Portrays Known Child Abuser as Hero
Juvenile Court Found Mother Culpable of Multiple Acts of Child Abuse

 
 

Fatherhood advocates have publicly revealed extensive court findings, records and testimony that indicate that Sadia Loeliger--portrayed as a heroic mom in a recent, nationally-broadcast PBS documentary--abused children under her care. A Tulare County Juvenile Court concluded in August of 1998 that Sadia Loeliger had committed multiple acts of abuse, and adjudged both her daughters as dependents of the Juvenile Court.

Sadia Loeliger and her 16 year-old daughter Fatima were key figures in PBS's Breaking the Silence: Children's Stories. The film purports to detail an alleged crisis of fit mothers losing custody of their children to violent husbands in divorce.  In the film, Sadia is portrayed as the victim of anti-mother bias in family courts.

The documents were revealed by Los Angeles-based newspaper columnist Glenn Sacks, who has helped lead a protest of the show, and Scott Loeliger, Fatima’s father who was divorced from Sadia in 1991.  According to Sacks:

"It’s amazing that PBS and the filmmakers decided--despite repeated warnings--to nationally televise Sadia and her claims. Not only were there clear Juvenile Court findings of her abuse of Fatima and also of Fatima's cousin Sara, who lived with Sadia, but we have extensive testimony from Sadia's babysitter, Sara, and several mental health professionals about Sadia's violence. The filmmakers put a child [Fatima] in an extremely difficult position."

Doris Nava Arellano, Sadia's babysitter for 18 months, testified that "every child in the house is afraid" of Sadia and that “Sara actually has scars on the back of her legs and on the left side of her head from Ms. Ali-Loeliger's attacks on her.”

Sara, then aged 15, penned a desperate letter detailing the abuse she suffered at Sadia's hands, writing “she hits in front of anyone anywhere with anything. I fear for my life sometimes. Just recently she hit me in the head.”

In the documents--posted on Sacks' website at www.glennsacks.com/pbs --Sadia is portrayed by numerous mental health, judicial and investigative authorities as violent and abusive towards the children under her care.

A child abuse investigator for Tehama County wrote that Fatima, then age eight, "says she is afraid to go home because she fears being hit again. She also expressed concern for the two other female minors in her mother's residence."

A therapist who conducted investigations for Shasta County Child Protective Services wrote that Fatima "told me she did not want to go home because she was afraid her mother was going to hit her."

Another therapist wrote "On two separate occasions this child reported to me that she was burned 'with a match' by her mother, Sadia Ali Loeliger....I am extremely concerned regarding this child's welfare."

Among the documents revealed are a series of letters, written to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and Breaking the Silence co-producers Tatge-Lasseur Productions and Connecticut Public Broadcasting, informing them of Sadia's history of child abuse.  The letters were written earlier this year by Scott Loeliger, a Northern California physician, and his attorney Dennis Roberts. They asked that footage of Scott’s daughter Fatima be excluded from the film. Despite this, PBS went forward with the broadcast, including the sections featuring Sadia and Fatima.

Breaking the Silence is already the source of considerable controversy. At the instigation of Sacks, Fathers and Families, Help Stop PAS Inc., the American Coalition for Fathers & Children, and others, PBS and its affiliates have been flooded with over 10,000 calls and letters protesting the show. Sacks calls the show a "direct assault on fatherhood" which "portrays fathers as batterers and child molesters who steal children from their mothers." 

Holstein, President of Fathers and Families, says:

"A few groups are concerned about the accelerating trend towards joint custody of children, and are striking back by accusing most fathers who seek custody of being batterers and child abusers. It's a shame PBS has dispensed with objective reporting and chosen to air an extremist point of view without looking at the political motives of the advocates it features.”

Sacks adds:

“It’s a shame they didn’t check the backgrounds of the mothers they chose to lionize more carefully, too."


Sadia Loeliger (above), portrayed as a heroic mom by PBS, abused children under her care.

Watch the Video
To watch Sadia and the daughter she alienated and turned against her father on PBS, click here, here, and here. The girl had been raised by her father for five years after a Juvenile Court discovered that Sadia was abusing the children under her care.

 
Sadia Loeliger Strikes Back--and Strikes Out: Sadia's Responses Refuted

Read the Juvenile Court's Findings That Sadia Committed Multiple Acts of Child Abuse

Babysitter's Affidavit: Sadia's a Violent Child Abuser, 'Every Child in the House is Afraid of Her'

Child Abuse Investigator Says Sadia Beats,  Hits, Abuses Her Children

Therapist/Assessor Says Fatima is Abused by Her Mother and Fears Her

Fatima's Former Therapist Warns of Sadia's Abuse, Asks Court to Suspend Visitation to Protect Fatima from Her Mother

Fatima's Cousin Sara Says 'I Fear for My Life' from Sadia's Abuse in Desperate Letter to Her Father in Kenya

Sadia Loeliger Arrested, Jailed for Felony Domestic Violence

Crime Report: Woman Calls 911 After Sadia Loeliger Attacks Her, Threatens Her Baby

Psychologist Cited by Sadia Loeliger Discusses Sadia's Violence

Scott Loeliger's First Wife Says Sadia Stalked and Harassed Her

Judge Phillips Describes Sadia as a Hateful, 'Obsessed,' Alienating Mother

Judge King Describes Sadia's Alienation Campaign, Predicts She Will Destroy Fatima's Bond with Her Dad

The Alienation of Fatima Loeliger

Custody Evaluator Describes Sadia as 'Volatile' and 'Out of Control'

Breaking the Silence's Producers Were Warned of Sadia's Record of Child Abuse

Newspaper Retracts Story Based on Sadia's Claims, Apologizes to Scott Loeliger

Fatima's Former Foster Mother Says Fatima Was Not Abused in Her Father's Home

Scott Loeliger's First Wife Says Scott Would Never Harm a Woman

Sadia Loeliger's Side of the Story

Defamed Father Demands Retraction, Apology from PBS

Timeline of the Loeliger Case

Learn more about our campaign against PBS's Breaking the Silence

 

 

Sign up for Fathers & Families' free weekly enewsletter

Home  |  Legal  |  Contact     •     email: glenn@glennsacks.com


Copyright © 2001 - 2010.  Fathers and Families.
All Rights Reserved.